History fan, bit of an obsession with Celts, Mongols, Vikings and dinosaurs. I love video games and RPG. Also love metal, especially Folk. Hmm, that's about it, I guess.

 

libutron:

Tui - Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae
Endemic to New Zealand, the commonly named Tui,Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae (Passeriformes - Meliphagidae) is an important pollinator of native forest flowers. The flowers of the harakeke, or flax, are perfectly shaped to fit the tui’s beak. The yellow colouring on this tui’s forehead is a dusting of pollen from the harakeke flowers from which it has been feeding on nectar.
They are intelligent, aggressively territorial, and are said to be able to imitate the calls of nearly every other bird, as well as a vast array of other sounds.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo and text credit: ©Sid Mosdell | Locality: Waikawa, Marlborough, New Zealand (2011)

libutron:

Tui - Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae

Endemic to New Zealand, the commonly named Tui,Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae (Passeriformes - Meliphagidae) is an important pollinator of native forest flowers. The flowers of the harakeke, or flax, are perfectly shaped to fit the tui’s beak. The yellow colouring on this tui’s forehead is a dusting of pollen from the harakeke flowers from which it has been feeding on nectar.

They are intelligent, aggressively territorial, and are said to be able to imitate the calls of nearly every other bird, as well as a vast array of other sounds.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo and text credit: ©Sid Mosdell | Locality: Waikawa, Marlborough, New Zealand (2011)

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Alan Turing
Brilliance cut tragically short by the narrow-mindedness of an earlier time.
‘If you crossed the room to talk to him, you would have probably found him gauche and rather reserved. He was decidedly lah-di-dah, but the reserve wasn’t standoffishness. He was shy, a man of few words. Polite small talk did not come easily to him. He might — if you were lucky — smile engagingly, his blue eyes twinkling, and come out with something quirky that would make you laugh. If conversation developed, you’d probably find him vivid and funny. He might ask you, in his rather high-pitched voice, whether you think a computer could ever enjoy strawberries and cream or could make you fall in love with it.’- B. Jack Kopeland, Turing: Pioneer of the Information Age

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Alan Turing

Brilliance cut tragically short by the narrow-mindedness of an earlier time.

If you crossed the room to talk to him, you would have probably found him gauche and rather reserved. He was decidedly lah-di-dah, but the reserve wasn’t standoffishness. He was shy, a man of few words. Polite small talk did not come easily to him. He might — if you were lucky — smile engagingly, his blue eyes twinkling, and come out with something quirky that would make you laugh. If conversation developed, you’d probably find him vivid and funny. He might ask you, in his rather high-pitched voice, whether you think a computer could ever enjoy strawberries and cream or could make you fall in love with it.’- B. Jack Kopeland, Turing: Pioneer of the Information Age

rhamphotheca:

Arctic National Wildlife Refuge -  Alaska
Antler Survey:  What can biologists learn from shed antlers? 
Well, pregnant caribou maintain their antlers until they give birth. This means they drop their antlers in the same area where they drop their calves. Therefore, biologists can determine where on Arctic Refuge caribou historically calved and when – all by collecting and dating antlers.  
(via: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service)

rhamphotheca:

Antler Survey:  What can biologists learn from shed antlers?

Well, pregnant caribou maintain their antlers until they give birth. This means they drop their antlers in the same area where they drop their calves. Therefore, biologists can determine where on Arctic Refuge caribou historically calved and when – all by collecting and dating antlers. 

(via: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service)

joakinmar:

Fantastic reconstructions of dinosaurs by concept artist Wayne Barlowe from An alphabet of dinosaurs (1995).

1. Gallimimus.

2. Iguanodon.

3. Maiasaura.

4. Oviraptor.

5. Velociraptor.

6. Yangchuanosaurus.

7. Chasmosaurus.

8. Zephyrosaurus.

laboratoryequipment:

We Evolved Unique Faces for a Purpose
The amazing variety of human faces – far greater than that of most other animals – is the result of evolutionary pressure to make each of us unique and easily recognizable, according to a new study by UC Berkeley scientists.
Our highly visual social interactions are almost certainly the driver of this evolutionary trend, said behavioral ecologist Michael Sheehan, a postdoctoral fellow in UC Berkeley’s Museum of Vertebrate Zoology. Many animals use smell or vocalization to identify individuals, making distinctive facial features unimportant, especially for animals that roam after dark, he said. But humans are different.
“Humans are phenomenally good at recognizing faces; there is a part of the brain specialized for that,” Sheehan said. “Our study now shows that humans have been selected to be unique and easily recognizable. It is clearly beneficial for me to recognize others, but also beneficial for me to be recognizable. Otherwise, we would all look more similar.”
“The idea that social interaction may have facilitated or led to selection for us to be individually recognizable implies that human social structure has driven the evolution of how we look,” said coauthor Michael Nachman, a population geneticist, professor of integrative biology and director of the UC Berkeley Museum of Vertebrate Zoology.
Continue reading…

laboratoryequipment:

We Evolved Unique Faces for a Purpose

The amazing variety of human faces – far greater than that of most other animals – is the result of evolutionary pressure to make each of us unique and easily recognizable, according to a new study by UC Berkeley scientists.

Our highly visual social interactions are almost certainly the driver of this evolutionary trend, said behavioral ecologist Michael Sheehan, a postdoctoral fellow in UC Berkeley’s Museum of Vertebrate Zoology. Many animals use smell or vocalization to identify individuals, making distinctive facial features unimportant, especially for animals that roam after dark, he said. But humans are different.

Humans are phenomenally good at recognizing faces; there is a part of the brain specialized for that, Sheehan said. Our study now shows that humans have been selected to be unique and easily recognizable. It is clearly beneficial for me to recognize others, but also beneficial for me to be recognizable. Otherwise, we would all look more similar.

The idea that social interaction may have facilitated or led to selection for us to be individually recognizable implies that human social structure has driven the evolution of how we look, said coauthor Michael Nachman, a population geneticist, professor of integrative biology and director of the UC Berkeley Museum of Vertebrate Zoology.

Continue reading…

ODYSSEUS: bro when will you fight
ACHILLES: when agamemnon stops being a righteous dick
ODYSSEUS: bro…people are dying
ACHILLES: [kickflips away] whatever